EDWARD GOREY'S ELEPHANT HOUSE
Whether Come By Epiplectic Bicycle with broken spoke or by willowdale handcar, Enter all Doubtful Guests, Hapless Children, Beastly Babies, Wuggly Umps, Gilded Bats, Osbick Birds, Deranged Cousins, Abandoned Socks, Lost Lions, Dancing Cats, Neglected Murderesses, Loathsome Couples, Prune People, Unknown Vegetables, Headless Busts, Welcome to This Deadly edward Blotter where this gorey party never dwindles.
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tattoolit:

"K is for Kate who was struck with an axe." Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies
Work by Annie at Inkfluence in Lubbock, Texas

tattoolit:

"K is for Kate who was struck with an axe." Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies

Work by Annie at Inkfluence in Lubbock, Texas

Source : tattoolit

iwrotehaikusaboutbukkake:

Orchid - We Hate You (Demo)

Source : iwrotehaikusaboutbukkake

Les Passementeries Horribles by Edward Gorey

Source : plumpkitten
The Bolster series contains 5 of 17 etchings known as The Posthumous Prints. After Gorey’s death, a series of previously unpublished etchings were discovered. Gotham Book Mart chose 3 of them to reproduce them in runs between 50 and 150 numbered copies in 2003. Afterwards, the Edward Gorey House took over the publication and sale of the remaining images. The prints are catalogued by the Gorey House as numbers 201-214; the Bolster prints are numbers 204-208. They were each produced in a series of 99 numbered sets and 26 lettered sets (except #212 which had no lettered set).

The Bolster series contains 5 of 17 etchings known as The Posthumous Prints. After Gorey’s death, a series of previously unpublished etchings were discovered. Gotham Book Mart chose 3 of them to reproduce them in runs between 50 and 150 numbered copies in 2003. Afterwards, the Edward Gorey House took over the publication and sale of the remaining images. The prints are catalogued by the Gorey House as numbers 201-214; the Bolster prints are numbers 204-208. They were each produced in a series of 99 numbered sets and 26 lettered sets (except #212 which had no lettered set).

Source : catalogue.swanngalleries.com
by Edward Gorey

by Edward Gorey

The Dark Angel based upon the novel UNCLE SILAS by Sheridan Le Fanu, poster illustrated by Edward Gorey

The Dark Angel based upon the novel UNCLE SILAS by Sheridan Le Fanu, poster illustrated by Edward Gorey

GOREY, EDWARD. Le Mélange Funeste. Illustrated by Gorey with pages sliced into three parts so various images can be combined. Small 8vo, pictorial stapled wrappers. first limited edition. number 470 of 500 copies signed by gorey, reserved for the author and publisher, from a total edition of 500 copies. Toledano A81a. New York: Gotham Book Mart, 1981

GOREY, EDWARD. Le Mélange Funeste. Illustrated by Gorey with pages sliced into three parts so various images can be combined. Small 8vo, pictorial stapled wrappers. first limited edition. number 470 of 500 copies signed by gorey, reserved for the author and publisher, from a total edition of 500 copies. Toledano A81a. New York: Gotham Book Mart, 1981

Source : catalogue.swanngalleries.com
ptk:

Edward St. John Gorey (American, 1925 - 1990).
Le Mélange Funeste.
Pen and ink drawing. Dated ‘89 UR, and signed en verso.

Le Mélange Funeste. Illustrated by Gorey with pages sliced into three parts so various images can be combined. 

ptk:

Edward St. John Gorey (American, 1925 - 1990).

Le Mélange Funeste.

Pen and ink drawing. Dated ‘89 UR, and signed en verso.

Le Mélange Funeste. Illustrated by Gorey with pages sliced into three parts so various images can be combined. 

Source : ptk
Fire Exit: Vaudeville for Eurydice by V. R. Lang at the Brattle Theatre

Fire Exit: Vaudeville for Eurydice by V. R. Lang at the Brattle Theatre

"After graduation in 1950, Gorey stayed in Cambridge and helped to establish the Poets’ Theatre. The Poets’ Theatre was first established by a group of poets living in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the fall of 1950. Their objective was to revive poetic drama and generate work by poets who "would act, administrate, direct, and sell tickets, while retaining total control of their own writing." Members included Richard Eberhart, John Ciardi, Richard Wilbur, V. R. (Violet Ranney "Bunny") Lang, Hugh Amory, John Ashbery, Edward Gorey, Donald Hall, William Matchett, George Montgomery, Frank O’Hara, Lyon Phelps, and others. Except for V. R. Lang, they were all attending Harvard College, or had recently graduated from it. Other names associated with the theater were: Alison Lurie, Kenneth Koch, Mary Manning Howe, Catharine Huntington, Edward Albert Thommen, and William Morris Hunt. In 1968 the theater building on Palmer Street burned down and the Poets’ Theatre ended. In October of 1986, a celebration was held in the Agassiz Theatre in Cambridge to memorialize the Poets’ Theatre, called by Edward Gorey a nostalgic "wake"—from the exhibition G is for Gorey—C is for Chicago, The Collection of Thomas Michalak, Loyola University: lib.luc.edu/specialcollections/exhibits/show/gorey/edward-gorey-at-harvard-univer/the-poet—-s-theatre.

"After graduation in 1950, Gorey stayed in Cambridge and helped to establish the Poets’ Theatre. The Poets’ Theatre was first established by a group of poets living in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the fall of 1950. Their objective was to revive poetic drama and generate work by poets who "would act, administrate, direct, and sell tickets, while retaining total control of their own writing." Members included Richard Eberhart, John Ciardi, Richard Wilbur, V. R. (Violet Ranney "Bunny") Lang, Hugh Amory, John Ashbery, Edward Gorey, Donald Hall, William Matchett, George Montgomery, Frank O’Hara, Lyon Phelps, and others. Except for V. R. Lang, they were all attending Harvard College, or had recently graduated from it. Other names associated with the theater were: Alison Lurie, Kenneth Koch, Mary Manning Howe, Catharine Huntington, Edward Albert Thommen, and William Morris Hunt. In 1968 the theater building on Palmer Street burned down and the Poets’ Theatre ended. In October of 1986, a celebration was held in the Agassiz Theatre in Cambridge to memorialize the Poets’ Theatre, called by Edward Gorey a nostalgic "wake"—from the exhibition G is for Gorey—C is for Chicago, The Collection of Thomas Michalak, Loyola University: lib.luc.edu/specialcollections/exhibits/show/gorey/edward-gorey-at-harvard-univer/the-poet—-s-theatre.

Source : goreyography.com
Source : catalogue.swanngalleries.com